Miami Art and Design: Miami Welcomes Sculptor Angel Orensanz


By: Tom Bellachio, 2014.

Miami Art and Design - Angel Orensanz - New York City

Sculptor Angel Orensanz presents his work at the Miami Art and Design art fair in Feburary 2014.

Sculptor Angel Orensanz represents just one of a notable list of contemporary artists who have made Miami a favorite destination for development, production and public formulation the artistic mind.

Orensanz’s work was actively accessible and on display at the current Miami Art Fair (Booth 312), which included a mesmerizing anthology of his sculpture, painting, drawing and photography/video.

Miami Art and Design - Angel Orensanz Foundation - New York City

Miami Art and Design 2014 fair presented the work of artists and galleries from across the international arts community.

His booth is one of the most visited at the Miami Art and Design fair; hundreds of experts, collectors, documentarians and visitors gathered in excitement over Angel Orensanz’s presence in the Southern metropolis.  This year, Orensanz presented bronze pieces, paintings, drawings and photography.  The common trait of his work is a subliminal, transcending magic that inserts into the visitor a universe of disturbing associations.

Miami Art and Design - Angel Orensanz Foundation - New York City

Luis Bunuel – Angel Orensanz develops a new installation art piece in the lands of Spain featured in much of Bunuel’s work.

Angel Orensanz developed a deep and mutually supportive rapport with surrealist and photographeer Luis Bunuel. Both were born in Aragon and were attracted to Paris and New York. Presently, Orensanz is developing an open sculpture project in the same landscapes of Western Spain where Luis Bunuel shot his “Tierra sin pan”  (Land without Bread), not far from the frontier with Portugal.

Bunuel visited Angel  Orensanz’s studio and Foundation in New York, installed for the last 30 years in a building that was erected in the early 19th century and is the oldest synagogue building in Manhattan. Bunuel enjoyed that heartland of references and meanings.

Angel Orensanz enjoys Miami’s artistic openness and fervor. He has brought a trove of mythical reptiles cast in Miami, which are featured in his booth (#312) at the current Miami Art Fair. Besides his mesmerizing sculptures his booth is populated with paintings, drawings and photography.

His photography work at the Miami Art and Design fair displays how prominently the medium serves as the doorway to the inner mind of Angel Orensanz, through which we levitate in a universe of oniric and fantastic constellations.
Miami Art and Design - Angel Orensanz Foundation 20134

Taxi Cab: New York City from the Rear Seat

THE REAR SEAT: Answering Questions and Asking Questions.

The Journey of a New York City Taxi Cab

By: Al Orensanz, PhD; Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

taxi cab, new york city, angel orensanz foundation for the arts

The New York City taxi cab serves as a conduit between destinations, but also the interwoven lives of individuals within them.

Most of our day-to-day information accumulates through idle conversations, and it infiltrates our awareness unexpectedly. We interact constantly and randomly with people who talk to us or who listen to us. We are educated through radio and TV broadcasts, and we are constantly alerted by our cellular phones, iPad messages, radio transmissions and commercial ads blinking from the skyscrapers. Throughout the city, we are exposed to taxi cab drivers, vendors, compatriots, old colleagues, spouses, children, receptionists relatives and neighbors.

We traverse the city by taxi cab. Points of interest are brought in by the kaleidoscope of the streets, advertisements, shop windows. The curiosity grows and a decision has to be made: should I engage or retreat? I still have some 30-odd minutes of taxi traveling left. Let me ask the driver. He is most likely talking on a device that I do not see.

taxi cab - new york city - angel orensanz - angel orensanz foundation for the arts

“Light Matter” by Angel Orensanz. The commute, even by taxi cab, can be the venue for inspiration and art.

Darkness engulfs us both. He has the front window available to scout and evaluate traffic strategies. I can see the sides but not my rear window view. My options are very limited. His are much wider and diversified. The driver initiates a conversation with me. The surroundings act as a backdrop. Our conversation gets more intense and specific as our trip progresses. The backdrop of the city moves and evolves as traffic weaves around us, providing context. The centerpiece of the discourse is a reservoir of memories, references, adapted anecdotes that are formulated and adapted to this specific moment and circumstance.

You never ride a taxi twice; you never talk to the same taxi driver twice. The streets are the same, and the buildings blur and dissipate in the immediacy or the distance. The speed renders the faces imperceptible. My attention splits and divides as I interact coincidentally with the driver and the city around me: on-going conversation is syncopated and distracted every few seconds.

Inside a New York City taxi cab, the darkness surrounds both parties. Conversation is either inevitable or avoided at all costs

Inside a New York City taxi cab, the darkness surrounds both parties. Conversation is either inevitable or avoided at all costs

The questions and answers are all stereotypical. We do not see faces but we hear our voices. With that alone, we can establish a bridge of communication. Obviously, our allocated time is short; the view of our faces is limited therefore is not engaging. The context of the streets and roads we circulate speeds ahead of us fast and uncompromising. There is very limited time for self and mutual exploration. Most of the time we instinctually agree on a common subject matter inconsequential for both sides.

The last moments of engagement come when the trip is ended; and we both descend. These are very short moments, seconds, of the encounter. But they are crucial, ceremonial and engaging.

taxi cab - new york city - angel orensanz - angel orensanz foundation for the arts

“Light Matter” by Angel Orensanz. The voyage as a source of inspiration.

While the departure from inside the taxi is uneventful, the farewell is reduced for the most part to the paying of the fare. The departure at the airport is marked by the eventful ceremonial of many other departures and arrivals: the suitcases, the trunks, the flowers bouquets, the gift-wrapped boxes, and the garments.

taxi cab - new york city - angel orensanz foundation for the arts

The New York City taxi cab.

The departure within the city streets and the departure at the airport have very different ceremonials for both the driver and the passenger. The taxi ride within the city has the specific limits of a domestic movement that remain within the domain of the immediate. The trip to the airport has the flare of a departure away from the confines of the routine, the familiar and the controllable.

We never look back to the departing taxi cab as it pulls into the street, having deposited us at our requested destination. The expensive and weary routine has been completed. Whether en route to an airport or twenty blocks home from work, the departure from the rear seat, from the interplay of questions and answers, results in a ever-hopeful forward glance to the journey ahead.

Art Basel 2014: Basel, Miami Beach, Hong Kong

Art Basel 2014 - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Art Basel 2014: Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong

by: Zoe V. Speas, The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

A strong tradition of art fairs in the international arts community emerged out of a need to cultivate connections between artists, galleries, and individual patrons, regardless of cultural or geographical divides. This year, the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts is proud to promote the Art Basel 2014 art fair in Miami Beach, Hong Kong, and Basel.

The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts presents the work of founding artists Angel Orensanz at such fairs as Art Palm Beach 2014 and Miami Art + Design (MA+D), but also presents artist materials and publications such as ARTSCAPE Magazine to the Art Basel 2014 Fairs out of Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong.

Art Basel 2014

Visitors gather at the exhibition area of the Gallery Bernier/Eliades (Athens) at the international art show “Art 39 Basel”, in Basel, Switzerland. Art Basel 2014.

(From the ART BASEL 2014 website.)


Connecting the international art community has been Art Basel’s goal since its beginning. Now, over forty years later, it ranks as the premier show of its kind, presenting 20th and 21st century art with a strong curatorial perspective. Its tradition of excellence across a wide range of genres offers visitors the most vital art that the world’s best galleries can offer.

In both Basel and Miami Beach now, and in Hong Kong moving forward, the week of the Art Basel 2014 show teems with parallel exhibitions and cultural events, creating an exciting environment that deepens and strengthens the relationship between gallerists, artists, curators and collectors.

Art Basel 2014

Art Basel 2014 links the artworlds of Miami Beach, Basel, and Hong Kong through its international fair.


The dynamic relationships between art galleries, their artists, private collectors and public institutions play an essential role in today’s artworld. Galleries support emerging artists by funding their production, introducing them to the artworld, and helping to shape and develop their careers. Well-established artists are generally represented by gallerists who over time have built an extensive international audience for the artist, both through shows in their own spaces and by promoting their work worldwide. Similarly, galleries active in historical material can help to increase or revive interest in an artist long after their death.

Today, fairs such as Art Basel 2014 function as the primary global promotional platform for galleries, allowing them access to a massive number of collectors and curators, people who come to fairs not only to discover new artists and new galleries, but also to deepen their engagement with those that they already know. Thus, a successful fair is one that not only generates sales for exhibitors, but also spurs new collectors and curators to follow the activities of their favorite artists all over the globe – and drives them to see shows in the year-round spaces of the galleries that have supported those artists so strongly.

ARTSCAPE Magazine Now Available!

It’s here! The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts proudly presents the latest issue of ARTSCAPE Magazine.

Now available for print or online subscription, ARTSCAPE Magazine is LIVE and ready for you to download today.

Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts - ARTSCAPE magazine

The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts – ARTSCAPE Magazine Summer/Fall Edition

ARTSCAPE Magazine reflects the cultural and artistic activities of the Angel Orensanz Foundation, a Manhattan-based organization for the arts and culture. Operating out of a beautiful, gothic-inspired building designed by Alexander Saeltzer in 1849, the Foundation seeks to reflect and maintain the artistic energy that pervades the New York City community.

Our magazine serves as a conduit between the affairs of the Foundation and the network of producing artists and innovators throughout New York City. By presenting content that relates art to implications of society and global culture, ARTSCAPE provides up-to-date arts-news coverage in the universally accessible format of vivid imagery and engaging texts. The goal remains, as always, to spark conversation and foster connectivity in an ever-expanding and ever-changing city.

ARTSCAPE magazine - Angel Orensanz Foundation

ARTSCAPE magazine – in print and available for purchase at The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts. Photo credit – Alexa Eskinazi

This edition features a collection of all-new reports on the arts scene in New York City and beyond. 

ARTSCAPE Magazine Articles Include:

  • Sacred Space: Art in Non-Neutral Environments
  • Language, Mind and Memory
  • Building an Art Paradise
  • Origins: The Influence of Space and History on the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Visit the Angel Orensanz Foundation homepage for more information about the Foundation and upcoming issues of ARTSCAPE Magazine and our NEWSLETTER!

Musicians. We. LOVE. Katy Gunn & Fred Baker – New York Music

Musicians. We. LOVE. – KATY GUNN and FRED BAKER take on the New York Music scene.

by: Zoe V. SpeasThe Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

The “We. LOVE.” series at the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts is proud to present a new chapter - Musicians. We. LOVE. This week, we’re excited to introduce to you the talents and stylings of Katy Gunn and her brother Fred Baker. 

New York Music

Musician. We. LOVE. Katy Gunn in performance.

FOLLOW THESE LINKS for a sampling of Katy Gunn’s track, “Beautiful Things” and Fred Baker’s “Pocket Full of Detritus”.

New York Music

Musicality as an inherited trait: Katy Gunn practices the violin with her older brother.

I’ve believed for a long time that musicality is an inherited trait as specific and definite as brown eyes vs. blue, or a crooked thumb vs. straight.

Katy and Fred have the gene, it’s undeniable, and while they both trained from their youth in classical violin and guitar respectively, today they’re searching for the soul of the city in their respective songwriting and poetry-rap explorations in the world of New York music.

New York Music

Fred Baker performing his unique style of what his sister refers to as “poetry-rap”

I first encountered these musicians at a private concert hosted by the Lower East Side’s New York music venue - the Living Room – a gorgeously intimate “talent incubator”  established in 1988 by Jennifer Gilson, who owns it with her husband, Steve Rosenthal.

Katy Gunn was one of the last few performers to have a night at the Living Room before it closed its doors temporarily.

It was not Katy’s first time at the venue—she has performed there before with other musical groups—but the evening was made even more special by the invitation I received by two wonderful members of the team at NOoSphere Arts on East Houston Street in the Lower East Side. Founding Artistic Director Sol Kjøk and gallery manager Annemarta Mugaas are friends of Ms. Gunn’s and have adopted her as a musician-in-residence at NOoSphere, where the brother and sister team have performed frequently in the past, often in conjunction with performance art and dance pieces sponsored by the gallery.

New York Music

Katy Gunn and Fred Baker perform at NOoSphere Arts on E. Houston Street in the Lower East Side.

Before I first parted the curtains to the private backroom performance space where Katy and her brother were performing, I was expecting a fully stocked band complete with percussionist, strings, guitar, and back-up vocals.

New York Music

Katy Gunn performs at the Living Room in New York’s Lower East Side with Fred Baker and vocalist, Thea Beemer.

When I stepped into the room and found only Katy and her brother and vocalist Thea Beemer, I was amazed. The trio created such fullness and variety of sound through Fred’s work on the sound pad and Katy’s ability to sing and orchestrate her violin simultaneously as Thea harmonized seamlessly with her melodies.

New York Music

Musicians. We. LOVE. Katy Gunn, New York Music.

The problem with my music,” said Katy of this complicated blending process, “is that there’s so much wacky instrumentation and orchestration—it’s a challenge to make it work live.

Through use of live sampling, Gunn’s multifaceted sound elicits the intimacy of a jazz/blues background, with an infectious pop/electronic dance beat.  The lyrics she composes touch on a variety of issues, from religion and faith (“All the People”) to the obsessive and all-consuming nature of love (“Beautiful Things”)—they speak to the search of an artist trying to understand the world and New York music through louder questions, and more colorfully.

“The more we divorce ourselves from religion, if art doesn’t replace that idea of spirit, we’ll all be in trouble,” Gunn says.

Learning about the process and resultant navigation of the New York music world can be an overwhelming experience, even sitting across from Katy Gunn and Fred Baker at a cozy Thai restaurant on the Lower East Side. Especially when she doesn’t seem to recognize it as such in the least.

Katy Gunn - New York Music

from – Katy Gunn’s photoshoot in Brooklyn.

As I ask her about the process she undergoes to develop a new song or new lyric idea, and she begins to explain – with difficulty, at times – I’m comforted to realize that it’s the same challenge, the same difficulty even that I face as a writer, grasping at wisps of an idea in the hopes of weaving it into something resembling a story.

It starts as an imprint,” says Gunn. “One I keep coming back to. I get a beat down, and then find lyrics that match with that rhythm. Sometimes I’ll wake up after sleep with ideas and I’ll try to go and find them again. When it’s something, I’ll listen to it and think, ‘I must have heard this somewhere before…’”

I’m nodding and swallowing heaps of Pad Thai at this point. I think Katy notices my far-off expression and dismisses my confusion with a sweep of her hand. Then she says something to me and to Fred that I’ll remember forever. Especially his response.

New York Music

Katy Gunn and Fred Baker, in performance.

“Anyone can do it, if you put your mind to it,” Katy Gunn assures me. Fred looks up from his curried chicken and rice dish and lifts an eyebrow. “Not anybody,” he adds firmly, and she doesn’t argue. Just smiles.

The truth of the matter is that Katy and Fred do what they do for the same reason that an artist creates, or a writer composes, or an actor takes the stage.

“When I do it well, it’s the only thing that makes me happy,” says Gunn.

“I’m totally paranoid leading up to it, but if it goes well, I’m lost in this lovely place—there have been times I’ve performed when I find myself in a separate world, watching it all happen. There’s no self-identity. It’s a living meditation.”

Listening to her music – and to the music of other up-and-coming new singer/songwriters of the New York music scene – is to participate just as fully as performing it. You become aligned with the artists’ message, you’re rooting for them, like noble underdogs fighting for the survival of art in the face of an increasingly oppressive Gotham City.

Follow Katy Gunn at her website for updates about performances, music downloads, and album releases!

Zoe V. Speas is a writer and editor for the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts. Follower her on tumblr and twitter.

Lou Reed: the Death of a Poet, Musician, and a Friend.

Lou Reed: the Death of a Poet, Musician, and a Friend.

By: Al Orensanz, Director of the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

 New York, November 5, 2013.

death of Lou Reed

The death of Lou Reed hits hard at the Angel Orensanz Foundation. Laurie Anderson and Lou Reed.

Laurie Anderson, wife of the late Lou Reed, has sent us copy of her letter to her husband’s friends, admirers and followers:

What a beautiful fall! Everything is shimmering and golden and all that incredible soft light. Water is surrounding us.

Lou and I have spent a lot of time here in upstate New York for the past few years, and even though we’re city people, this is our spiritual home. Last week, I promised Lou to get him out of the hospital and come home to Springs. And we made it!

Lou Reed

from the letter written by Laurie Anderson, wife of the late Lou Reed.

Lou was a tai chi master and spent his last days here being happy and dazzled by the beauty and power and softness of nature. He died on Sunday morning looking at the trees and doing the famous 21 form of tai chi with just his musician’s hands moving through the air.

Lou was a prince and a fighter and I know his songs of the pain and beauty in the world will fill many people with the incredible joy he felt for life. Long live the beauty that comes down and through and onto all of us.

Laurie Anderson, his loving wife and eternal friend.”

Lou Reed

Lou Reed; 1942-2013.

Lou Reed came often to our building in Lower Manhattan for concerts and literary presentations. We conversed frequently: he was an admirer of the art of Angel Orensanz, and we were devoted admirers of his talent and his charm.

Lou Reed, enjoy your eternal rest. Remember us; we will always be here. 

Banksy Street Art: The End of an Era

The End of an Era: A month of Banksy Street Art in New York

by: Zoe V. SpeasThe Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Banksy Street Art residence in New York City - from October 27 in Greenpoint.

Banksy street art residence in New York City – from October 27 in Greenpoint.

October has been a busy month in the art world. We had a government shutdown, a Banksy street art residence, and consequent reactions ranging from outrage to a revitalization of  the question of defining art.

It all ties together, really, and that’s what I wanted to talk about before Halloween hits us full-force tonight and it’s November before we know it or remember how it came upon us so quickly.

banksy street art

The shutdown. Remember when that happened?

(Hey.  Remember when THIS happened?)

The first piece I wrote for the Angel Orensanz Foundation was a discussion about the definition of art, creatively entitled, “What is Art?” I scratched it out in a pitifully banged-up notebook during the long train ride from Richmond, VA to Penn Station, NYC.

I talked about how art is fundamentally dramatic—there are countless full-length theatrical dramas and comedies featuring characters that are artists or connoisseurs of art because of this quality. Whatever definition you assign to art, I believe it must allow for the drama and the conflict that is created by putting brush to canvas, hands to clay, etc. We thrive off of this drama, we need it, and we live for it because it illustrates the constant questions that percolate beneath the surface in us from day to day.

banksy street art - angel orensanz

Tahir Square. Angel Orensanz. Politics in art.

Too bad our society isn’t crafted to allow for the necessity of art.

In fact, we spend a lot of effort and money marginalizing art into something to do with leisure or entertainment. But there’s a difference—a monstrosity of a difference—between leisure/entertainment and art. Leaving the theatre after a production of Harold Pinter’s Betrayal or Shakespeare’s Richard III, I’m certainly not at my leisure. Entertained? More like slapped in the face by humanity.

By the way, those productions I just listed? Totally playing right now in NYC. Check them out. You’re welcome.

So, of course, when the government shut down for the first time in seventeen years, what’s the first thing to be cut from funding?

banksy street art

Always the first thing to go: shutting down the museums, shutting down the government.

The National Endowment for the Arts. In other words, the museums—the culture hubs, the “non-essentials.”

And in the middle of that conflict, Banksy comes to New York City for a self-curated artist’s residence and stirs the pot for us.

Banksy - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts - New York City

Banksy street art at Yankee Stadium. October 30, 2013.

Banksy’s street art residency is called “Better Out Than In: an Artist’s Residency on the Streets of New York”, and beneath the stencil-outline header, a quote from Paul Cézanne triumphs the mission statement of the work.

All pictures painted inside, in the studio, will never be as good as those done outside.

I’ll say that perhaps the “outside” to which Cézanne referred might be of a slightly different context than the interpretation apparent in the Banksy street art, but in terms of impact? Banksy’s been spot-on.

banksy street art

“Better Out Than In” – Bansky street art residence in NYC. October 2013.

All of a sudden art—regardless of how you define it—emerges as a buzzword, a hot topic, the spark that ignites a city of people, young and old, desperate for a cause to impassion them enough to speak out.

It’s impassioned me, anyway.

I’ve spoken to gallery owners, artists, event planners, businessmen, and students about Banksy street art in New York this past month and I encountered no one who had nothing to say, no comment to add. In fact, the topic has served as a jumping-off point to larger issues of politics and society and the boundaries that divide generation from generation.

For myself, I have always been loath to discuss political leanings with friends and acquaintances—the ensuing arguments inevitably evolve into a loop of misunderstanding and personal affront. I prefer to stay within the realm of art and theatre where I feel comfortable arguing my beliefs—and yes, maybe that makes me a coward, being afraid of engaging in a dispute for fear of defeat or humiliation.

banksy street art

Banksy’s Greenpoint portrait being painted over by a masked woman. Which is the graffiti – the Banksy street art or the silver paint obscuring it?

Graffiti does ruin people’s property and it’s a sign of decay and loss of control,” the mayor said, “Art is art, and nobody’s a bigger supporter of the arts than I am–you running up to somebody’s property or public property and defacing it is not my definition of art. Or it may be art, but it should not be permitted.” 

Mayor Michael Bloomberg, October 2013.

And yet, this October, I found myself spewing fire over the contradictions arising between vandalism and art, between art as a necessity and our unhesitating cessation of its funding when goings get tough, between the opinions of the Mayor of New York and the arts community of his city.

Banksy’s residence brought me to a single, perhaps obvious conclusion:

If I argued before that art is fundamentally dramatic, then it also must be deeply political.

I’m going to risk sounding like a college sophomore writing a term paper and quote the dictionary at you here—a definition of the word political“relating to relationships of power between people in an organization; to affairs of the state or government.”

Relationships of power between people. Yup. Sounds about right.

Art becomes the venue through which people can argue rights of individualism and power upon a level playing field. There are no mayors, governors, nor presidents: only personal expression and paintbrushes. And regardless of what you think of the Banksy street art and its artistic merits, his residence challenges us to question our relationship to one another, to our government, and to the city walls that house and protect us. 

Call it graffiti or call it art.

It was swift, it was dramatic, and it defined the month of October for me and countless other New Yorkers. Happy Holidays, everyone.

Angel Orensanz for Art Palm Beach 2014

The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts and Contemporary Art Gallery Returns to Art Palm Beach 2014

Zoe V. Speas; The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts


The Angel Orensanz Gallery and Museum is pleased to announce its participation in Art Palm Beach, January 23-27, 2014.

Art Palm Beach 2014

Artist Angel Orensanz exhibits permanently at the former “Norfolk Street Synagogue”, home to the Orensanz Museum and Gallery. Orensanz will attend the Art Palm Beach 2014 fair.

The Gallery will present The Collective Unconscious, a series of dramatic new sculptures and paintings by Spanish artist Angel Orensanz. Orensanz has been exhibiting internationally since the 1960s and has a permanent exhibit at the Orensanz Foundation, located inside the former “Norfolk Street Synagogue” in New York City’s Lower East Side.

Burning Bronzes

Art Palm Beach 2014, Angel Orensanz, Burning Bronzes

From the Burning Bronzes episode of the Collective Unconscious series, which Angel Orensanz will present at the Art Palm Beach 2014 fair.

Burning Bronzes, a series of miniature-to-middle scale sculptures, speaks to the artist’s journey from Earth and Land Art into his current medium.

Working with the bronze and stoneware, according to Orensanz, “brings me into closer communion with the earth through my art.”

The sculptures on display will represent a continuation of the artist’s study of the human form and its manipulation, while paying homage to a tradition of indigenous art from around the world.


Bodies - Angel Orensanz - Art Palm Beach 2014

From the ‘Bodies‘ series by Angel Orensanz – an exploration of the human figure continues this winter at Art Palm Beach 2014.

Bodies consists of an incredibly diverse sequence of drawings in charcoal, graphite, ink, and, occasionally, coffee grounds. Angel Orensanz explores human anatomy through a highly vibrant mix of line weight and texture.

Angel Orensanz - Art Palm Beach 2014 - Sculpture

1961. Dinosaurio. Unknown location. Angel Orensanz.

The figures he depicts contort and bend in an expression ranging from agony to ecstasy.

Orensanz began his training in the 1950s at L’Ecole Superieure des Beaux Arts in Paris with in-depth, literal study of the human body. Over the decades, his use of “body” and “form” has become an abstraction and a metaphor for the human condition and for the current project, Collective Unconscious.


The Language of Fire

Language of Fire - Angel Orensanz - Art Palm Beach 2014.

Angel Orensanz presents the Language of Fire as part of the upcoming Collective Unconscious exhibit for Art Palm Beach 2014.

Language of Fire bridges the worlds of painting, sculpture, and photography. Through his use of fire, plastics, and vivid color, Angel Orensanz illustrates the universal language of creativity, which defies boundaries of nationality and race. The artist employs a range of scale and perspective in these living photographs, verging almost into the realm of optical illusion. The images are often reflections and, being taken from the artist’s perspective, the shadow of Angel Orensanz’s figure may often be found within the complex layers of each portrait.

A comprehensive catalog with accompanying essays will be produced for the purpose of the artist’s participation in Art Palm Beach 2014.


For more information on Art Palm Beach 2014:

Media Inquiries: The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts, 212.529.7194.

Fair Hours:  Preview – January 23rd 6:00-7:30pm; Collectors Invitational 7:30-10:00pm; January 24th-27th 12-7pm (6:00pm on the 27th).

Location: Palm Beach County Convention Center, 650 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

Verbal Communication and the Art of Conversation.

What is verbal communication?

by: Al Orensanz, DirectorThe Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Angel Orensanz - The Language of Fire - what is verbal communication

From Angel Orensanz’s The Language of Fire – what is verbal communication? It’s the same as the dialogue between an artist and his medium.

What is verbal communication?Conversation exists as a link between diverse minds, characters and perspectives. The immediate participants are the speakers, each equipped with a specific set of languages, registers, labels and linguistic codes.

For verbal communication  to transpire, it requires a gathering of multiple, individual minds.

These include first and foremost the minds of the main participants, but might also include some silent, distant contributors incorporated through references, quotations, pictures, video, digital background and other forms of participation. Such stimuli—TV stories and imageries that burst from the depths of distant memories—can trigger points of conversation simply by association.  That way, the verbal communication and conversation becomes multiple in the sense that interactions occur not only between the interlocutors involved, but between the environment of the room, of the urban landscape, or the countryside, which slips into and colors the content of what is being said and introduced.

There is no such thing as a spontaneous conversation.

Angel Orensanz - What is verbal communication - The Language of Fire

Selection of photo art from Angel Orensanz’s LANGUAGE OF FIRE.

We are not inventing our language as we speak; language pre-exists all our encounters. Our words and sentences were formulated, coined and exchanged long before the moment of communication. In addition, conversation does not occur in a void or in vacuum.

what is verbal communication?

Photo-Exhibit by Angel Orensanz at the Saint Petersburg Academy of the Arts

Every sentence we might think to organize has been uttered and reformulated countless times before for a variety of contexts and goals. Such previous verbal incarnations provides the key to our understanding of statements uttered in any language or in any script, once the morphology has been detected and reconstructed.

Love TEDTalks? So do we. Check out this video about by Steven Pinker: What our Language Habits Reveal – What is verbal communication?

Angel Orensanz - what is verbal communication? - Light Matter

From Angel Orensanz’s LIGHT MATTER. What is verbal communication? An interplay between the participant and his environment, much like Angel Orensanz’s interaction with physical space in his art.

Conversation is always creative and innovative. It determines the pathways of our mind and the formulation of our sentences. It measures the appropriateness of questions and their answers, of statements and the silence of a gesture, of the accents of formulation and the position of the speaker.

The ingenuity of conversation allows us to process several lines of thought coming from multiple different speakers simultaneously. Despite the crowded environment of numerous strains of verbal communication, we are able to register one main line of discourse, towards which the various lateral and collateral observations are ascribed and formulated.

Angel Orensanz - The Language of Fire - What is verbal communication

What is verbal communication? “There is no such thing as a spontaneous conversation.” Angel Orensanz’s The Language of Fire

In a dialogue with multiple participants, it becomes the most clear it is the logos, the verbal communication, the language that first and foremost prevails and manifests itself. In the course of our inevitable departure from the original pathways of conversation, conflicting lines of thought and perception are constantly re-assembled. Therefore, the internal plurality of all truth becomes patent and operative. It becomes truly dialogue.

Language Of Fire by Angel Orensanz

Language of Fire; Fire is a natural element charged with connotations of transcendence, punishment, purification and transience. All sacred books are filled with references and metaphors of fire. And so is daily life. In the hands of Angel Orensanz, fire is a sculptural material that is altered, animated, personalized and conjured. We need it close to our bodies but our bodies tremble in front of it, taking distance, precautions, fear and hallucinations.

Language Of Fire

Language Of Fire by Angel Orensanz

More pungent than matter itself fire is the halo of the matter, the hallucination of the explosion and the terror of the flame. Being inflamed is having lost the direction and context of everything that surrounds the individual.

The fire moves between the two poles of the light and the flame, between the warmth of the hearth and the devastation of the ashes, Fire stimulates dialogue and conversation and provokes fear and distance.


Language of Fire by Angel Orensanz

Language of Fire by Angel Orensanz

Language of Fire

In this  collection of Angel Orensanz artwork he uses flames and random elements that surround us. The photograph capture each moment, each movement of futility and makes it eternal.

Language of Fire by Angel Orensanz

Language of Fire by Angel Orensanz

Come and visit us!

Prints of this work will will be display at the Angel Orensanz Foundation for public viewing and it will be available for sale. from May 10th until June 15th between 10:am and 5:00 pm Mon – Fri. Saturdays by appointments only.

Angel Orensanz Foundation
172 Norfolk Street
New York, NY 10002