Miami Art and Design: Miami Welcomes Sculptor Angel Orensanz


By: Tom Bellachio, 2014.

Miami Art and Design - Angel Orensanz - New York City

Sculptor Angel Orensanz presents his work at the Miami Art and Design art fair in Feburary 2014.

Sculptor Angel Orensanz represents just one of a notable list of contemporary artists who have made Miami a favorite destination for development, production and public formulation the artistic mind.

Orensanz’s work was actively accessible and on display at the current Miami Art Fair (Booth 312), which included a mesmerizing anthology of his sculpture, painting, drawing and photography/video.

Miami Art and Design - Angel Orensanz Foundation - New York City

Miami Art and Design 2014 fair presented the work of artists and galleries from across the international arts community.

His booth is one of the most visited at the Miami Art and Design fair; hundreds of experts, collectors, documentarians and visitors gathered in excitement over Angel Orensanz’s presence in the Southern metropolis.  This year, Orensanz presented bronze pieces, paintings, drawings and photography.  The common trait of his work is a subliminal, transcending magic that inserts into the visitor a universe of disturbing associations.

Miami Art and Design - Angel Orensanz Foundation - New York City

Luis Bunuel – Angel Orensanz develops a new installation art piece in the lands of Spain featured in much of Bunuel’s work.

Angel Orensanz developed a deep and mutually supportive rapport with surrealist and photographeer Luis Bunuel. Both were born in Aragon and were attracted to Paris and New York. Presently, Orensanz is developing an open sculpture project in the same landscapes of Western Spain where Luis Bunuel shot his “Tierra sin pan”  (Land without Bread), not far from the frontier with Portugal.

Bunuel visited Angel  Orensanz’s studio and Foundation in New York, installed for the last 30 years in a building that was erected in the early 19th century and is the oldest synagogue building in Manhattan. Bunuel enjoyed that heartland of references and meanings.

Angel Orensanz enjoys Miami’s artistic openness and fervor. He has brought a trove of mythical reptiles cast in Miami, which are featured in his booth (#312) at the current Miami Art Fair. Besides his mesmerizing sculptures his booth is populated with paintings, drawings and photography.

His photography work at the Miami Art and Design fair displays how prominently the medium serves as the doorway to the inner mind of Angel Orensanz, through which we levitate in a universe of oniric and fantastic constellations.
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Remembering Philip Seymour Hoffman: an “Artists. We. LOVE.” Special Edition.

Philip Seymour Hoffman: The Death of an Artist

An Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts Special Report – “Artists. We. LOVE.” – Philip Seymour Hoffman

by: Zoe V. SpeasThe Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Philip Seymour Hoffman - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts - New York City

“To be loved, I think, is the thing that gets you up in the morning.” – Philip Seymour Hoffman (1967-2014).

From the National Public Radio’s interview with actor Philip Seymour Hoffman in 2012. (On playing Willy Loman in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman)

“It’s never that simple – why we’re here, what are we doing? Family, work, friends, hopes, dreams, careers… What is happiness? What is success? What does it mean? Is it important? How do you get it?   To be loved, I think, is the thing that gets you up in the morning.”

With great sadness and respect today I present our newest edition of “Artists. We. LOVE.” at the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts in New York City. On behalf of the Foundation, I would like to commemorate and pay homage to the life and work of a truly gifted actor of stage and screen: Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Philip Seymour Hoffman - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts - New York City

Philip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote in the 2005 film “Capote.”

The actor passed away yesterday morning of an apparent drug overdose in his West Village office apartment. He was forty-six years old.

His apartment is mere blocks away from New York University, where Hoffman graduated from the Tisch School of the Arts with a BFA in 1989. Recently, the actor actively participated in an on-going petition against the University’s $6 billion “Sexton Plan” proposal to expand the institution in 2031, potentially devastating the historical district of New York’s Greenwich Village. Hoffman was joined by celebrities such as Padma Lakshmi, Philip Glass, and Fran Lebowitz in a partnership with the NYU Faculty Against the Sexton Plan to hold a celebrity auction with the goal of raising money for opposing legal action.

One of the items in the celebrity auction included a two-hour acting lesson with Philip Seymour Hoffman.

If you’ve not been familiar with the actor’s portfolio of work over the last two decades, I’ll reiterate the sort of list you can find in the New York Times or the Post to summarize Hoffman’s career.

Philip Seymour Hoffman - Death - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts - New York City

Brigitte Lacombe for New York Magazine. Philip Seymour Hoffman as Willy Loman in Arthur Miller’s ‘Death of a Salesman’ 2012.

The actor’s first role was as a defendant on the television program Law and Order in 1991, after which he made his film debut in the Al Pacino film Scent of a Woman in 1992. Hoffman’s major roles have included Brandt in The Big Lebowski (1998) and Truman Capote in Capote (2005), for which he won the Academy Award. He portrayed the villainous Owen Davian in Mission Impossible: III (2006), Father Brendan Flynn in Doubt (2008), as well as Lancaster Dodd in The Master (2012) directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, with whom the actor collaborated for five out of the director’s six films to date.

Philip Seymour Hoffman - The Angel Orensanz Foundation

The very first on-screen appearance for Hoffman was a defendant in ‘Law and Order’ in 1991.

Philip Seymour Hoffman’s extensive theatrical background includes performances in the 2000 revival of Sam Shepard’s True West and the 2003 revival of Eugene O’Neill’s A Long Day’s Journey into Night. Most recently, Hoffman tackled the iconic role of Willy Loman in the Broadway production of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman directed by Mike Nichols. For all three performances, Hoffman was nominated for the theatre’s prestigious Tony Award.   Hoffman had just seven days of filming remaining for his current work with the Hunger Games franchise. The production company plans to release the two final installments (Mockingjay: Part 1 and Mockingjay: Part 2) with the actor’s completed work posthumously in 2014 and 2015 respectively. He portrayed the character of Plutarch Heavensbee in the film adaptation of author Suzanne Collins’ YA trilogy.

It’s a heavy thing to outline the life achievements of a man after he’s gone, as though the catalogue is intended to deepen the impact of his loss in some way. Perhaps, with celebrity culture being as intimate and as removed as it is today, we simply need something to say to illustrate our connection with a man we never knew but loved from our places in the darkened seats of a cinema house.

Philip Seymour Hoffman - The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts - New York City

Philip Seymour Hoffman and the cast of ‘The Hunger Games: Catching Fire’ sequel which opened in the US in 2013.

Not to say that our relationship as audience members with the deceased has no meaning or depth: with the onslaught of celebrity deaths in the past year(s), the emotional outcry of a grieving public is evidence enough of this depth of feeling. The truth is, it was a relationship – a tenuous, symbiotic interchange between the artist and the public that has been a pillar of our culture for centuries. Every artist in the industry relies upon his audience to survive. Money and box office revenue aside, what would Death of a Salesman be without living, breathing souls to witness the art of actors bringing characters to life? A film played upon an enormous screen in an empty house is nothing more than a multi-million dollar light show with no resonance. You need hearts and minds for the kind of resonance that Hoffman triggered in his work.

Money, fame, status – they’re just the side effects. And not necessarily positive ones, at that.

Philip Seymour Hoffman - New York City - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the ArtsSo, no, we didn’t know the late Mr. Hoffman. We didn’t know the man. We didn’t share in his life and his personal experiences. Like many of my friends, I posted a few words on Facebook in memory of the actor. My heart twists when I think of the family he leaves behind, of the three young children and their mom, of all the fellow actors and directors who had the opportunity to create art with this man, of friends who loved him.

Of everyone who understands death a little too well now, and for whom life will never be the same.

This is not celebrity-dom. This is life and death. This is universal. We stand up in a service for the loved ones we lose and speak of the sanctity of their memory. We press our hands to the hands of grieving family members who will immortalize the deceased through their love. And the death of famous members of our society are not exempt to this ritual. But perhaps we must acknowledge that artists like Philip Seymour Hoffman have a second, more public, more emblematic death mourned by audiences of strangers who followed and supported his career.

Philip Seymour Hoffman - The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Philip Seymour Hoffman on acting.

The death of the man coincides with the death of the artist, and we knew the artist. We mourn the artist. And we celebrate in the immortality that our relationship as the public has given the artist. For as long as there are screens and projectors and audiences, the work lives on – captured and preserved for the sake of generations to come.

Theatre. We. LOVE – Ensemble Studio Theatre’s “Year of the Rooster”

“YEAR of the ROOSTER” – An EST/Youngblood Production – Eric Dufault asks you to “WAKE the F*#K UP!”

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

The EST/Youngblood production of Eric Dufault’s ‘YEAR OF THE ROOSTER’ begins its extended run January 2014.

Theatre. We. LOVE at the Angel Orensanz Foundation sits down with the cast and crew of EST’s production of “Year of the Rooster.”

by: Zoe V. SpeasThe Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

The wintry months of January and February mark my second anniversary with the City of New York. Most of my time was spent with one hand gripping onto the handrail of “back home” while I tried to skitter around the perimeter of the city on borrowed ice skates. I’m still here, surviving, but it has taken all of those two years for me to come around to letting go of the rail. I have let go, and it’s due almost entirely to the three-month-long relationship I’ve had so far with the Ensemble Studio Theatre/Youngbloods production of Eric Dufault’s Year of the Rooster.

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the ArtsAs you’ll see by the title of this blog and subsequent headers, the point of my post is to tell you about all the brilliant, hilarious, inspiring things that the creative team of Rooster had to say when they generously sat down to talk to their fan (me) for an interview. I will do that. I promise. And let me tell you, sitting around a modestly-sized conference table surrounded by people whose transformations into warrior-roosters and  power-hungry McDonald’s managers – it can be pretty overwhelming.

Not to mention the fact that proximity to playwright Eric Dufault (in all of his humble, talented niceness) kind of makes you torn between wanting to hug and bake for him or beat his brains out in a jealous rage. At least then you could see close-up what the brains would look like of someone who can invite his audience into the world of cockfighting and middle-America and give it the grandeur of gladiators fighting in a Roman coliseum.

Grandeur, I need to add, made possible by director John Giampietro‘s excellent choice to underscore the action of the play with classical symphonies and fugues by Ludwig van Beethoven.

Ensemble Studio Theatre - Year of the Rooster - Theatre. We. LOVE - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Playwright Eric Dufault has always had a strong connection with animals, and much of his work incorporates the idea of “talking animals”, including the ongoing production of ‘YEAR OF THE ROOSTER’ at EST.

“I’ve always written plays that involve talking animals, including chickens,” Eric told me. He explained that he grew up surrounded by animals as a kid, chickens and roosters included. “But I read this book called Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some we Eat and that sparked the idea for Year of the Rooster. It included a section on cockfighting.”

Here’s a kicker. Rooster was the first play he’d written for the Youngbloods.

“I write pretty quickly,” he said.


Anyway, so this relationship – this three-month-long relationship I mentioned having with Year of the Rooster, it began back in the fall when the nightshift bartender from my favorite local pub – McCoy’s, on 9th Ave in Hell’s Kitchen – showed me a graphic postcard advertising for the show at the Ensemble Studio Theatre. It’s this very image (at the top of this blog), the one of a rooster devised entirely out of matchsticks scorched to various degrees, that now graces the front of the program for the show.

The postcard instructed me to “Wake the F#$k Up.”

Which, honestly, I hadn’t managed to do yet since moving to the city two years ago. I figured I could use the caffeine.

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Ensemble Studio Theatre presents: Eric Dufault’s “Year of the Rooster”. Above (left to right): Delphi Harrington, Bobby Moreno. Photo Credit: Russ Kuhner

“The energy of this piece – it’s not something you watch. It’s something you go through,” EST’s Bobby Moreno said to me later. Bobby plays the character of Odysseus Rex aka ‘Odie.’ He’s the rooster you root for, the one who wants to murder the sun. You know. That one. “The structure of the play and the way the audience is arranged around it creates an inescapable intimacy in the experience.”

In other words, Dufault’s storyline and Giampietro’s direction wakes you the f$&k up.

By the end of the show, I was doubled over in pain. My stomach muscles were on fire with the pain of laughing way too much and way too loudly.

I didn’t know where I was for much of the production. We sat in a small, intimate theatre on the second floor of the EST building on W. 52nd, but with just a few, sparse blocks of furniture (and an amazingly accurate recreation of a McDonald’s restaurant), I was transported to middle-of-nowhere Oklahoma. Yet it was the physicality of the actors like Denny Dale Bess, an EST member since 2000 who plays Dickie Thimble in Rooster, as he strode through the space, cowboy-booted with a massive ten gallon-hat that transformed the location for me.

The production was so grounded and sincere in its commitment to each given circumstance – circumstances that grew more and more ridiculous and tragic as the plot progressed – that I forgot the Rooster world was one we can all agree is not “of us.” It’s an “other” world. Cock-fighting. Isolation. McDonald’s (both as an employee and gentically-modified chicken aka the brilliant Megan Tusing, I might add).

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

EST’s “Year of the Rooster” – From left to right: Thomas Lyons, Denny Dale Bess, Bobby Moreno. Photo Credit Russ Kuhner

Suddenly, we’re all from Oklahoma. Which we are, in our own ways. We’re all from that town, the one Eric Dufault creates with the characters of Gil Pepper and his aging mother, Lou. With Philippa and Dickie Thimble.

Of course, Denny’s family actually does originate from Oklahoma, I learned later in our interview, and these ties created a special bond for him with the environment of Rooster.

“I know these small towns,” said Denny, “each character in this piece is a part of my family.” In fact, the actors and Eric told me Denny’s relationship with Oklahoma was in large part the reason for the creative choice to isolate the play in his home state.

 But my wake-up call continued.

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

From the Ensemble Studio Theatre production “Year of the Rooster.” From left to right, Thomas Lyons and Bobby Moreno. Photo Credit Russ Kuhner.

I was already shifting uncomfortably in my seat by intermission as I realized I was watching something happen that I dreamed was possible someday for my own writing, my own performance. The stagecraft was genius, reality grounded, characters as specific and genuine as ink-stamped fingerprints. I won’t go on and on about the beauty of the roosters when they really start to rage. It’s like watching a fully-staged battle scene in the opera, Carmen, but it’s just two guys and a bucket of feathers. You have to see what fight director Qui Nguyen came up with for the fight scenes in Rooster. You just have to.

But the wake-up call, it continued long after I had exited the theatre, having trouble focusing on my feet as I descended the stairs to the street, program clutched in my fingers.

I remember calling my mom (because who else do you call when you have one of your twentysomethings’ revelations about life?) as I walked to McCoy’s and telling her I’d found artists, real artists – the ones that create universes out of nothing, the ones who give everything of themselves to it without a thought. As much as I felt it, as a witness, imagine how the actors feel it every night they come together.

“I’ve never been involved in a cast where they show up two hours early to a call to do a line-through,” said Megan Tusing (seen below) during my sit-down. “They never do this show at less than 110-percent.”

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

EST’s “Year of the Rooster” – from left to right: Megan Tusing and Bobby Moreno. Photo Credit Russ Kuhner.

Stage Manager of Rooster Eileen Lalley, who calls such a tight show every night that I’m barely conscious of the passage of time, quickly added to this. “I’ve seen this show over a hundred times. I never get tired of it. I never sit in the dark checking my email, killing time. I can’t. The show always changes every night.”

EST member Thomas Lyons (Gil Pepper) pointed to his face, which had a pretty impressive shiner on the day of our interview and said, “Look at my face. This show doesn’t work on cruise control.”

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the ArtsYear of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

EST Member Denny Dale Bess in “Year of the Rooster” as Dickie Thimble. From the Unfiltered Production.

Watch Thomas for ten minutes as he battles with Megan, Denny, and his deliciously degrading mother played by the fabulous Delphi Harrington, and you see what he means.

EST has been operating for over forty years in New York City, developing new theatre in America to the tune of 6,000 new titles throughout their history. Programs like Youngbloods for playwrights under 30 serve to keep this mission alive.

We’re not blind to it. Budgets hurt. Theatre suffers as we suffer as the economy suffers, and there are no gymnasts flying from the rafters of EST dressed in spandex and shooting webs from their wrists.

I know I sat there among the actors and creative team, gushing about EST and Year of the Rooster, without a real clue of the difficulties and challenges behind keeping even such a historic company as the Ensemble Studio Theatre afloat.

I know, I know. I know. It’s tough. It’s tough as nails. We’re all roosters in a ring in New York City, fighting the biggest, meanest mother of a bird we’ve ever been up against.

But that art like Rooster can exist? Can be born into the world of commercialism on stage and celebrity-driven box office revenue and survive? And thrive? Here?


I guess it’s time to let go of the hand-rail, Zoe. It will all skate right past you if you don’t.

 Like I said, wake-up call.

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

EST’s “Year of the Rooster” left to right: Bobby Moreno and Thomas Lyons. Photo Credit Russ Kuhner

So it’s been three months now, and I’ve followed with proud fanaticism the progress of the extension of Year of the Rooster at the Ensemble Studio Theatre. I see the team passing through McCoy’s every now and then and each time I unabashedly sprint towards them and repeat the same garbled lines of “being super excited to see it” when it re-opens.

They’re mercifully patient with me, but I think it’s because we see the same thing when we see that rooster devised of burned matchsticks. We see possibility. We see fire and power and drive. We see the future of art and theatre. And despite the cold and the money and the work and the fatigue, we know that we’re a part of it.

We’re part of that message that EST and thousands of other theatre artists are screaming throughout New York City:

Wake. The. F#^k. Up.

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Year of the Rooster - Ensemble Studio Theatre - NYC - Theatre. We. LOVE. - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Taxi Cab: New York City from the Rear Seat

THE REAR SEAT: Answering Questions and Asking Questions.

The Journey of a New York City Taxi Cab

By: Al Orensanz, PhD; Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

taxi cab, new york city, angel orensanz foundation for the arts

The New York City taxi cab serves as a conduit between destinations, but also the interwoven lives of individuals within them.

Most of our day-to-day information accumulates through idle conversations, and it infiltrates our awareness unexpectedly. We interact constantly and randomly with people who talk to us or who listen to us. We are educated through radio and TV broadcasts, and we are constantly alerted by our cellular phones, iPad messages, radio transmissions and commercial ads blinking from the skyscrapers. Throughout the city, we are exposed to taxi cab drivers, vendors, compatriots, old colleagues, spouses, children, receptionists relatives and neighbors.

We traverse the city by taxi cab. Points of interest are brought in by the kaleidoscope of the streets, advertisements, shop windows. The curiosity grows and a decision has to be made: should I engage or retreat? I still have some 30-odd minutes of taxi traveling left. Let me ask the driver. He is most likely talking on a device that I do not see.

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“Light Matter” by Angel Orensanz. The commute, even by taxi cab, can be the venue for inspiration and art.

Darkness engulfs us both. He has the front window available to scout and evaluate traffic strategies. I can see the sides but not my rear window view. My options are very limited. His are much wider and diversified. The driver initiates a conversation with me. The surroundings act as a backdrop. Our conversation gets more intense and specific as our trip progresses. The backdrop of the city moves and evolves as traffic weaves around us, providing context. The centerpiece of the discourse is a reservoir of memories, references, adapted anecdotes that are formulated and adapted to this specific moment and circumstance.

You never ride a taxi twice; you never talk to the same taxi driver twice. The streets are the same, and the buildings blur and dissipate in the immediacy or the distance. The speed renders the faces imperceptible. My attention splits and divides as I interact coincidentally with the driver and the city around me: on-going conversation is syncopated and distracted every few seconds.

Inside a New York City taxi cab, the darkness surrounds both parties. Conversation is either inevitable or avoided at all costs

Inside a New York City taxi cab, the darkness surrounds both parties. Conversation is either inevitable or avoided at all costs

The questions and answers are all stereotypical. We do not see faces but we hear our voices. With that alone, we can establish a bridge of communication. Obviously, our allocated time is short; the view of our faces is limited therefore is not engaging. The context of the streets and roads we circulate speeds ahead of us fast and uncompromising. There is very limited time for self and mutual exploration. Most of the time we instinctually agree on a common subject matter inconsequential for both sides.

The last moments of engagement come when the trip is ended; and we both descend. These are very short moments, seconds, of the encounter. But they are crucial, ceremonial and engaging.

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“Light Matter” by Angel Orensanz. The voyage as a source of inspiration.

While the departure from inside the taxi is uneventful, the farewell is reduced for the most part to the paying of the fare. The departure at the airport is marked by the eventful ceremonial of many other departures and arrivals: the suitcases, the trunks, the flowers bouquets, the gift-wrapped boxes, and the garments.

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The New York City taxi cab.

The departure within the city streets and the departure at the airport have very different ceremonials for both the driver and the passenger. The taxi ride within the city has the specific limits of a domestic movement that remain within the domain of the immediate. The trip to the airport has the flare of a departure away from the confines of the routine, the familiar and the controllable.

We never look back to the departing taxi cab as it pulls into the street, having deposited us at our requested destination. The expensive and weary routine has been completed. Whether en route to an airport or twenty blocks home from work, the departure from the rear seat, from the interplay of questions and answers, results in a ever-hopeful forward glance to the journey ahead.

In the Steps of Gargallo: Figurative Monuments in Metal Sculpture

In the Steps of Gargallo: Figurative Monuments in Metal Sculpture  

By: Al Orensanz, PhD., Director - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts  

Abstract or figurative? This was the disjunction with which all the artists of the time were faced, and even though pictorial modernity in Spain had for some time already been inclined to informalism, sculpture artist Angel Orensanz followed the cautious steps of his admired Pablo Gargallo and Julio González, and those of so many other more recent sculptors that also vacillated between the abstract or figurative.

This was especially true if such artists aspired to dedicate themselves to monumental sculpture, since this type of commission is almost always given by the authorities, who in the Spain of that time were not as open and modern as some more advanced private or corporate patrons.

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Monumento a la Jacetania. Ángel Orensanz. Monumental sculpture. 1969.

It is thus not at all surprising that it was for a private collector, owner of a sculpture park in Bellaterra (Barcelona), that the first totally abstract exempt monument erected by Angel Orensanz emerged in 1969: a menhir of 7 meters in height which he executed in two blocks of stone, working by carving directly into grooves and irregularities, which this time were not reserved only to the upper parts, but also extended throughout the lower parts.

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“Monumenta a la Jota” – Angel Orensanz. Sculpture. 1970. Spain.

In contrast, on September 25, 1970, feast day of the patron saint of the village, Angel ORensanz inaugurated in Albalate del Arzobispo (Teruel) his Monumento a la Jota (Monument to the Jota), in which for a change the abstract geometries remained confined to a tall poured-cement podium.

This serves simultaneously as a backdrop for the ground level statue of a well-built singer of jotas, and as a podium on which are raised those of a pair of young dancers: they are once again hieratic figures —something striking in the representation of joteros, even though the dance of Albalete is known for its grace.   They are formed of geometric planes, like those of the Saragossan monuments to the Mother and to Tío Jorge; but this time Orensanz uses for the first time cut and welded steel plates, marking out planes and hollows in a style derivative of the cubism which was so widespread in the Spain of the transition and the start of democracy, one of whose most tenacious exponents would be the Aragonese José Gonzalvo. This said, the model for this solemn mastery in the evocation of volume based on plates and striking hollows was none other than Pablo Gargallo, Aragonese sculptor well known to Orensanz, since he had dedicated to Gargallo,

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“The Great Prophet.” 1933 (bronze) – Pablo Gargallo. Sculpture.

We can say that Gargallo’s splendid Gran Profeta (Great Prophet) has, as adopted sons, two colossi of imposing beards and manes made by Angel Orensanz for the cities of Jaca and Monzón.   The Monumento a la Jacetania (Monument to the Lands of Jaca), raised in 1969 in the square of Biscós in Jaca, is a gigantic titan 7 meters in height and more than two tons in weight, which represents in concrete and steel a pilgrim of the Road to Santiago. The figure’s facial expression shares the limelight with a model of the cloister of the monastery of San Juan de la Peña carried in an offertory gesture with arms outstretched, also in steel. In the lower part, below an oculum of Romanesque reminiscences, the pillars that evoke his body have on each side of a split which represents the Aragon river crosssing the Jacetania in vertical alignment, four sculptural vignettes decorated with fired-enamel gold paint, in which are paid homage other typical elements of the region.

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“Monumento a la Jacetania.” Sculpture. Angel Orensanz.

These include the Holy Grail of San Juan de la Peña, the Cathedral of Jaca, The Book of La Cadena and musical instruments—and also a modern industry as well as an skier (of which he also made a larger version, with welded iron plates, which has been in the exhibition Los Orensanz de Orensanz).

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“Monumento a Joaquín.” Costa Monzón, Huesca, Spain. Angel Orensanz. Sculpture. 1978.

His Monumento a Joaquín Costa (Monument to Joaquín Costa) in his native city of Monzón is also colossal: in this case the homage to Gargallo’s largest and most well known sculpture is even more evident, since the celebrated deputy raises his arms like a prophet preaching. This imagery is not typical in any picture of Costa, but is very appropriate for the staging of the “Grito del Agua”, when every September 14th social groups of all kinds gather before the monument in homage to the great apostle of regeneration and irrigation. His strange gesticulating figure in plates of enameled steel presides over the Avenue of Lérida from a podium of coffered concrete, before some pillars, also of concrete, which serve as a visual backdrop on the other side of the fountain.

Once again then, a very stage-like composition in two parts, like in the monuments to Tío Jorge and the Jota, although the style here is already very different, much more abstract than figurative, since it is of much later date, for it was inaugurated by the local authorities on September 21, 1978, as is stated on the identifying plaque. This same plaque alludes to the financing of the work by CAMPZAR, a savings entity which a few years later would place works by Ángel Orensanz in front of their Saragossa headquarters.

Art Basel 2014: Basel, Miami Beach, Hong Kong

Art Basel 2014 - Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Art Basel 2014: Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong

by: Zoe V. Speas, The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

A strong tradition of art fairs in the international arts community emerged out of a need to cultivate connections between artists, galleries, and individual patrons, regardless of cultural or geographical divides. This year, the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts is proud to promote the Art Basel 2014 art fair in Miami Beach, Hong Kong, and Basel.

The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts presents the work of founding artists Angel Orensanz at such fairs as Art Palm Beach 2014 and Miami Art + Design (MA+D), but also presents artist materials and publications such as ARTSCAPE Magazine to the Art Basel 2014 Fairs out of Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong.

Art Basel 2014

Visitors gather at the exhibition area of the Gallery Bernier/Eliades (Athens) at the international art show “Art 39 Basel”, in Basel, Switzerland. Art Basel 2014.

(From the ART BASEL 2014 website.)


Connecting the international art community has been Art Basel’s goal since its beginning. Now, over forty years later, it ranks as the premier show of its kind, presenting 20th and 21st century art with a strong curatorial perspective. Its tradition of excellence across a wide range of genres offers visitors the most vital art that the world’s best galleries can offer.

In both Basel and Miami Beach now, and in Hong Kong moving forward, the week of the Art Basel 2014 show teems with parallel exhibitions and cultural events, creating an exciting environment that deepens and strengthens the relationship between gallerists, artists, curators and collectors.

Art Basel 2014

Art Basel 2014 links the artworlds of Miami Beach, Basel, and Hong Kong through its international fair.


The dynamic relationships between art galleries, their artists, private collectors and public institutions play an essential role in today’s artworld. Galleries support emerging artists by funding their production, introducing them to the artworld, and helping to shape and develop their careers. Well-established artists are generally represented by gallerists who over time have built an extensive international audience for the artist, both through shows in their own spaces and by promoting their work worldwide. Similarly, galleries active in historical material can help to increase or revive interest in an artist long after their death.

Today, fairs such as Art Basel 2014 function as the primary global promotional platform for galleries, allowing them access to a massive number of collectors and curators, people who come to fairs not only to discover new artists and new galleries, but also to deepen their engagement with those that they already know. Thus, a successful fair is one that not only generates sales for exhibitors, but also spurs new collectors and curators to follow the activities of their favorite artists all over the globe – and drives them to see shows in the year-round spaces of the galleries that have supported those artists so strongly.

ARTSCAPE Magazine Now Available!

It’s here! The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts proudly presents the latest issue of ARTSCAPE Magazine.

Now available for print or online subscription, ARTSCAPE Magazine is LIVE and ready for you to download today.

Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts - ARTSCAPE magazine

The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts – ARTSCAPE Magazine Summer/Fall Edition

ARTSCAPE Magazine reflects the cultural and artistic activities of the Angel Orensanz Foundation, a Manhattan-based organization for the arts and culture. Operating out of a beautiful, gothic-inspired building designed by Alexander Saeltzer in 1849, the Foundation seeks to reflect and maintain the artistic energy that pervades the New York City community.

Our magazine serves as a conduit between the affairs of the Foundation and the network of producing artists and innovators throughout New York City. By presenting content that relates art to implications of society and global culture, ARTSCAPE provides up-to-date arts-news coverage in the universally accessible format of vivid imagery and engaging texts. The goal remains, as always, to spark conversation and foster connectivity in an ever-expanding and ever-changing city.

ARTSCAPE magazine - Angel Orensanz Foundation

ARTSCAPE magazine – in print and available for purchase at The Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts. Photo credit – Alexa Eskinazi

This edition features a collection of all-new reports on the arts scene in New York City and beyond. 

ARTSCAPE Magazine Articles Include:

  • Sacred Space: Art in Non-Neutral Environments
  • Language, Mind and Memory
  • Building an Art Paradise
  • Origins: The Influence of Space and History on the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

Visit the Angel Orensanz Foundation homepage for more information about the Foundation and upcoming issues of ARTSCAPE Magazine and our NEWSLETTER!

Musicians. We. LOVE. Katy Gunn & Fred Baker – New York Music

Musicians. We. LOVE. – KATY GUNN and FRED BAKER take on the New York Music scene.

by: Zoe V. SpeasThe Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts

The “We. LOVE.” series at the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts is proud to present a new chapter - Musicians. We. LOVE. This week, we’re excited to introduce to you the talents and stylings of Katy Gunn and her brother Fred Baker. 

New York Music

Musician. We. LOVE. Katy Gunn in performance.

FOLLOW THESE LINKS for a sampling of Katy Gunn’s track, “Beautiful Things” and Fred Baker’s “Pocket Full of Detritus”.

New York Music

Musicality as an inherited trait: Katy Gunn practices the violin with her older brother.

I’ve believed for a long time that musicality is an inherited trait as specific and definite as brown eyes vs. blue, or a crooked thumb vs. straight.

Katy and Fred have the gene, it’s undeniable, and while they both trained from their youth in classical violin and guitar respectively, today they’re searching for the soul of the city in their respective songwriting and poetry-rap explorations in the world of New York music.

New York Music

Fred Baker performing his unique style of what his sister refers to as “poetry-rap”

I first encountered these musicians at a private concert hosted by the Lower East Side’s New York music venue - the Living Room – a gorgeously intimate “talent incubator”  established in 1988 by Jennifer Gilson, who owns it with her husband, Steve Rosenthal.

Katy Gunn was one of the last few performers to have a night at the Living Room before it closed its doors temporarily.

It was not Katy’s first time at the venue—she has performed there before with other musical groups—but the evening was made even more special by the invitation I received by two wonderful members of the team at NOoSphere Arts on East Houston Street in the Lower East Side. Founding Artistic Director Sol Kjøk and gallery manager Annemarta Mugaas are friends of Ms. Gunn’s and have adopted her as a musician-in-residence at NOoSphere, where the brother and sister team have performed frequently in the past, often in conjunction with performance art and dance pieces sponsored by the gallery.

New York Music

Katy Gunn and Fred Baker perform at NOoSphere Arts on E. Houston Street in the Lower East Side.

Before I first parted the curtains to the private backroom performance space where Katy and her brother were performing, I was expecting a fully stocked band complete with percussionist, strings, guitar, and back-up vocals.

New York Music

Katy Gunn performs at the Living Room in New York’s Lower East Side with Fred Baker and vocalist, Thea Beemer.

When I stepped into the room and found only Katy and her brother and vocalist Thea Beemer, I was amazed. The trio created such fullness and variety of sound through Fred’s work on the sound pad and Katy’s ability to sing and orchestrate her violin simultaneously as Thea harmonized seamlessly with her melodies.

New York Music

Musicians. We. LOVE. Katy Gunn, New York Music.

The problem with my music,” said Katy of this complicated blending process, “is that there’s so much wacky instrumentation and orchestration—it’s a challenge to make it work live.

Through use of live sampling, Gunn’s multifaceted sound elicits the intimacy of a jazz/blues background, with an infectious pop/electronic dance beat.  The lyrics she composes touch on a variety of issues, from religion and faith (“All the People”) to the obsessive and all-consuming nature of love (“Beautiful Things”)—they speak to the search of an artist trying to understand the world and New York music through louder questions, and more colorfully.

“The more we divorce ourselves from religion, if art doesn’t replace that idea of spirit, we’ll all be in trouble,” Gunn says.

Learning about the process and resultant navigation of the New York music world can be an overwhelming experience, even sitting across from Katy Gunn and Fred Baker at a cozy Thai restaurant on the Lower East Side. Especially when she doesn’t seem to recognize it as such in the least.

Katy Gunn - New York Music

from – Katy Gunn’s photoshoot in Brooklyn.

As I ask her about the process she undergoes to develop a new song or new lyric idea, and she begins to explain – with difficulty, at times – I’m comforted to realize that it’s the same challenge, the same difficulty even that I face as a writer, grasping at wisps of an idea in the hopes of weaving it into something resembling a story.

It starts as an imprint,” says Gunn. “One I keep coming back to. I get a beat down, and then find lyrics that match with that rhythm. Sometimes I’ll wake up after sleep with ideas and I’ll try to go and find them again. When it’s something, I’ll listen to it and think, ‘I must have heard this somewhere before…’”

I’m nodding and swallowing heaps of Pad Thai at this point. I think Katy notices my far-off expression and dismisses my confusion with a sweep of her hand. Then she says something to me and to Fred that I’ll remember forever. Especially his response.

New York Music

Katy Gunn and Fred Baker, in performance.

“Anyone can do it, if you put your mind to it,” Katy Gunn assures me. Fred looks up from his curried chicken and rice dish and lifts an eyebrow. “Not anybody,” he adds firmly, and she doesn’t argue. Just smiles.

The truth of the matter is that Katy and Fred do what they do for the same reason that an artist creates, or a writer composes, or an actor takes the stage.

“When I do it well, it’s the only thing that makes me happy,” says Gunn.

“I’m totally paranoid leading up to it, but if it goes well, I’m lost in this lovely place—there have been times I’ve performed when I find myself in a separate world, watching it all happen. There’s no self-identity. It’s a living meditation.”

Listening to her music – and to the music of other up-and-coming new singer/songwriters of the New York music scene – is to participate just as fully as performing it. You become aligned with the artists’ message, you’re rooting for them, like noble underdogs fighting for the survival of art in the face of an increasingly oppressive Gotham City.

Follow Katy Gunn at her website for updates about performances, music downloads, and album releases!

Zoe V. Speas is a writer and editor for the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts. Follower her on tumblr and twitter.

White Paradise (William Forsythe)

Today the Angel Orensanz Foundation blog is going to talk about a rather fascinating installation that has traveled to numerous places around the globe!
Scattered Crowd by artist, dancer, and choreographer William Forsythe is made up of thousands of white balloons suspended and scattered throughout “galleries, museums, banks and other architecturally significant spaces”.  For guests it is like walking in a sea of whiteness, perhaps even a metaphorical heaven. The art installation also has an audio side to it, which is suiting as Forsythe also choreographs his own ensemble, The Forsythe Company. The accompanying music, by Ekkehard Ehlers, creates a sense of serenity – even adding to that feeling of walking through a metaphorical heaven made up of white balloons .It is an unforgetable interactive art expirience.

Forsythe was born in New York, and he first began his career in art as a dancer, being formally trained in Florida and working with the Joffrey Ballet and Stuttgart Ballet. As he continued to excel and choreograph for the Stuttgart he began teaching at the Ballet Frankfurt until it’s closing, when he established his own company. His dance choreography has since expanded, and he has been commissioned on many occasions to “produce architectural and performance installations” much like his Scattered Crowd, which premiered on March 15th, 2002 in Frankfurt, Messe, Halle 7.

A preview of A Portrait of America (2)

Yesterday the Angel Orensanz Foundation blog posted a preview of some of the artists that will be featured at the Angel Orensanz Gallery for Joy Wai Gallery’s A Portrait of America, curated by Ramses Granados, on November 26th, 2012. Today, the preview continues with more artists that will be showing their work here in the Lower East Side in New York City.

Xany Rudoff

Born in Pasadena, California to an artist mother and art historian father, Xany (now LA based) has been working as a professional painter for the past ten years. Trained at one of the most prestigious fine art programs in the country, UCLA, Rudoff has been featured in many notable publications including Vanity Fairy Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, The LA Weekly, and in the London Art publication, Cock No.7, for their “Dreams” Issue. In the late 1990’s she began her highly political series about the Vietnam War and the American Media touching upon such highly charged issues.

Paul Seftel

Paul Seftel is a British American artist born in London in 1974. Educated in London and Edinburgh he has been based in NYC since 2007. The lifetime artist, Seftel has been the director of PS Project Space in Chelsea since July 2011. His work is inspired deeply by the alchemy of color, and the youth and truth of the American cultural and environmental landscape. Having spent many years living in New Mexico, Colorado, and Kauai, the spirit and timelessness of cultural ghosts are all inspirations drawn through the present energy, gritty industry, and vision that is hidden beneath the surface of NYC and America. Seftel has been exhibiting his works far and wide for more than a decade, and is in collections across the US and internationally. The two symbols and portraits of America represented here are his most literal and conceptual of works.


Will Sergeant

Will Sergeant is best known as the founding member and inventive guitarist of Echo and the Bunnymen. Alongside his work in the music world he has had long and varied links with the art world. Working on sound art projects at international festivals including Ars Electronica, Linz Austria, Futuresonic Manchester and various venues in Liverpool, England. In recent years he has expanded his artistic output to painting and printmaking – and his screen prints were featured in the Mr. Brainwash LA Show in 2011. He also staged two successful solo exhibitions in 2012 at the Penny Lane Gallery, Liverpool and the Substrate Gallery, Los Angeles.

Cheryl Farber Smith

Cheryl Farber Smith’s highly wrought and imaginative sculptures are nothing short of expressing emotionally lyrical space. Under her masterful control, simple geometrical elements become animated with dance-like grace. Sharp lines, suspended circles, measured angles flow effortlessly into one another, inviting our imagination to play whimsically with these unforgettable characters. She pushes her very own sculptures to reveal hidden secrets, uncharted spaces, undisclosed to our primary gaze. Sometimes using densely colored transparencies of her photographed work, she superimposes these images to discover exotic geometrical forms that lay buried in the intricate folds of her sculptures. It is with her attuned sensibility that Smith fashions deeply engaging art, and renders new spatial frontiers worthy of exploration.

Jen Starr

“It seems I have been “art directing” since I can remember. I started out in hair and make-up at age 15 working for photographers in and around Los Angeles. Growing up in Los Angeles I moved into a career in music and developed an enormous respect for imagery. From a very young age I understood the need for great photographs. I looked to glamour and fashion as a tool in my creative process. In my photography I’ve combined fashion, beauty and music as well as black and white fine art. I have been published in several publications including London-based Fault magazine. A huge supporter of mine and enjoy working with them immensely. I am focused on expressing my most intimate feelings through my work. I have shot several celebrities, bands and amazing models through out my journey as a photographer; and hope to continue this process for a long time. My main focus is to speak my soul when I am shooting. This is “life” to me. My feeling is I shall always continue the process of showing my evolution as an artist. A day does not go by that I do not work, shoot or breathe. My love is for this medium.”


Aki Takematsu

Aki Takematsu is a freelance photographer based in Tokyo, Japan. She started her career in 1998 as a sports photographer for Sports Nippon Newspaper. In 2008, she moved to New York and completed the One Year Documentary Photography and Photojournalism Program at the International Center of Photography. Aki uses photography as a tool to capture ordinary, fleeting moments that are easily overlooked or seen and immediately forgotten. The still photograph gives us time to pause and reflect on something that we may not have noticed, or deserves more consideration than the split-second that it took place in. She was a nominee at New York Photo Festival 2009, the 4th annual Photography Masters Cup 2010 and the 6th annual Black & White Spider Awards 2011.

Bruno Tamiozzo

Born in Rome in 1976, Bruno Tamiozzo developed his love for photography by chance. He starts teaching himself the art by reading manuals and various thematic books, until he made his way to the Academy of the Great Arts in Rome, where he graduated with honors in 2003. Between 2003 and 2004 he attended the Master in Photojournalism and Reportage at The Institute of Photography and Integrated Communication, directed and coordinated by Dario Coletti and Manuela Fugenzi. In addition he also follows workshops of photo-editors of agencies and newspapers such as: Internazionale, AGF, Contrasto, The New York Times. He also attends photographic workshops with: Antoine D’Agagata (Magnum Photos) Francesco Zizola (Independent) Paolo Pellegrin (Magnum Photos) Letizia Battaglia (Independent) Patrick Zachmann (Magnum Photos) AngeloTuretta (Contrasto) Franco Zecchin (Independent).

Joy Wai

A successful curator and the founder of the Joy Wai Gallery, art can be said to be found in Joy Wai’s genes. Growing up in Beijing, Wai spent her formidable years in the studio of her grandfather and artistic mentor, the painter and collector Hui Xiao Tong. She moved to New York in 2004 and studied at the International Center of Photography. Having rediscovered her love of art at the ICP, Wai returned to China the following year to begin her first art project. Traveling to 22 cities throughout China’s western and southwest countryside over the course of two months, Wai photographed the faces of hundreds of citizens, turning her sojourn into the book Faces and Stages: My journey in China (2008). That same year she returned to the US, obtained American citizenship, and opened the Joy Wai Gallery. This also happened to be the year when Barack Obama was elected to the presidency, ushering in an era of hope and change that had a dramatic impact on Wai and inspired her to conceive of A Portrait of America.


Born, raised, and educated in Taiwan, Wen-Chi has been New York Based for the last 20 years and has made quite a name for herself here in the states. An all round artist, she has been a creative and adventurous soul since childhood, actively involved in painting, performance art, literature, drama, music, fashion/accessory design, and costume design. She worked for the legendary fashion designer Bill Blass in the 90’s, and then started her own accessory/fine-‐art jewelry line. At the same time she began designing costumes for films, TV, and theater. Her work includes costume design for the acclaimed Oscar-‐winning director Ang Lee. After going through a journey of the mind, body and spirit Wen-Chi was inspired to spread her creative energy and opted for a paint brush and oil paints, instead of sketch pads and cloth.